The greatest danger in times of turbulence is not the turbulence – it is to act with yesterday’s logic - Peter Drucker

Why managing quality in healthcare requires a steady hand

Why managing quality in healthcare requires a steady hand

 Managing quality in healthcare seems like a rather sedate affair in the academic literature. In my experience it’s more like trying to control a herd of wild horses!  

I know….sounds a bit dramatic.

But this is how I see it when I reflect back on my service management days. It’s important to keep control of all the key elements of quality to achieve genuine service improvement. The challenge for all leaders in healthcare is to maintain a steady hand.

The wild horses I’m referring to are the Six Dimensions of Quality —

timely,

safety,

person centred,

efficiency,

effectiveness

equity

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Context and service improvement: Why a systemic lens helps

Context and service improvement: Why a systemic lens helps

Most of what's written on the subject of service improvement tells us that what works in one setting is unlikely to work in another. At least not without some modification. Consideration of context is as important as programme design when facilitating change. 

Emotional intelligence enables the leader to humanise the connection between the goal for improvement and those implementing the changes. But sometimes the voice of the system can thwart even the most engaging of leaders. Ever experienced that? No matter what you do, the team just can't move forward?

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'Bed blocker' label is tantamount to abuse

'Bed blocker' label is tantamount to abuse

Listening to radio 4 while driving yesterday, I was engrossed. It was a phone-in programme about the NHS being 'weaponised' as the UK hurtles towards another general election.

Pretty much everyone phoning in said political parties should stop point scoring. But few thought it would be possible to extricate the NHS from politics. Elections are won and lost on whether or not public services like the NHS are delivering what the electorate expect them to.

What jarred though was the words being used. In the past the NHS was a 'political football' now it is being 'weaponised'.

When did that shift in language happen?

And importantly, what does the shift to such violent nomenclature suggest? Are we becoming immune to the meanings of words? And if so, how does this affect our psyche?

'Bed blocker' was the other term at the centre of much debate.

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Recent Comments
Guest — Liz Myers
I couldn't agree more Eileen, but it is not just the terminology. I believe there is an unhealthy focus on patients who are delay... Read More
Friday, 06 February 2015 17:16
Guest — Liz Myers
I couldn't agree more Eileen, but it is not just the terminology. I believe there is an unhealthy focus on patients who are delay... Read More
Friday, 06 February 2015 17:16

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