The greatest danger in times of turbulence is not the turbulence – it is to act with yesterday’s logic - Peter Drucker

The TurningTides Blog

Ideas and inspiration from Turning Tides

U Lab Reflections at the turn of the U

U Lab Reflections

I'm undertaking the U Lab programme sponsored by Scottish Government. Angie Meffan-Main who is coordinating the programme invited me to write a blog post on the experience so far.  Here's my reflections....

Half-way through the U Lab programme it's too early to report on outcomes. We're currently sitting at the bottom of the U.

Instead I reflect on the origins of The Melting Pot Hub in Edinburgh and some of the questions that are arising for me as Host. Maybe these questions will resonate with others.

Hubs are a feature of the U Lab programme and bring the learning alive. They're self organised and connect people by virtue of special interest or locality.  

Since the independence referendum and probably long before, people in Scotland, whatever their political affiliation, seemed to be searching for something different. It was nebulous but palpable. 

If change is so 'wanted', does this mean that the journey to the 'something different' will be easier? Less fraught? 

When the conditions are right and the political will is there, will change happen more fluidly? 

These are some of the questions that have emerged for me.

The Roots of What's Gone Before Are Still Growing

Otto Scharmer describes the dance between the security of the familiar and fear of the unknown as the complex interplay of 'Presencing' and 'Absencing'.

Dayna Cunningham's contributions as a guest speaker during week 3 of U Lab were particularly powerful. Using a tree metaphor to describe her experience of campaigning against racism, she reflected that you can chop down the tree but the roots continue growing unseen for years to come.  

Liken the roots to the behaviours that support the status quo and you get a sense of why planned change can be problematic. The roots of what's gone before are still there to trip you up.

Continue reading
  1340 Hits
  0 Comments
1340 Hits
0 Comments

Change and the things that sustain us

Over eight years on and he still speaks about it. How he sat with his wife as she took her last breaths. Their two sons had joined them at the hospital after the urgent phone calls. Two daughters lived too far away. They wouldn't have got there in time.

He reflects on how, when both sons arrived at the hospital, he said in a hushed tone to his wife "that's them both here now, pet". She had been drifting in a semi-coma, unresponsive, for some hours but he describes how she squeezed his hand seconds before slipping away. He's convinced it was her way of saying good bye.

Who could argue with him? Who would want to? It was the final instalment in the story of their lives. The most poignant moment in fifty-five years of marriage.

Continue reading
  1389 Hits
  0 Comments
1389 Hits
0 Comments

'Bed blocker' label is tantamount to abuse

'Bed blocker' label is tantamount to abuse

Listening to radio 4 while driving yesterday, I was engrossed. It was a phone-in programme about the NHS being 'weaponised' as the UK hurtles towards another general election.

Pretty much everyone phoning in said political parties should stop point scoring. But few thought it would be possible to extricate the NHS from politics. Elections are won and lost on whether or not public services like the NHS are delivering what the electorate expect them to.

What jarred though was the words being used. In the past the NHS was a 'political football' now it is being 'weaponised'.

When did that shift in language happen?

And importantly, what does the shift to such violent nomenclature suggest? Are we becoming immune to the meanings of words? And if so, how does this affect our psyche?

'Bed blocker' was the other term at the centre of much debate.

Continue reading
  1654 Hits
  2 Comments
1654 Hits
2 Comments